Table 2

The association between combinations of psychosocial work factors and blood pressure/hypertension

Psychosocial work factorsSystolic blood pressure (mm Hg)Diastolic blood pressure (mm Hg)Hypertension
B (95% CI)B (95% CI)OR (95% CI)
JS – / ERI – / ED –, (n=6890)ReferenceReferenceReference
JS + / ERI + / ED +, (n=5363)−0.48 (−0.96 to 0.01)0.14 (−0.18 to 0.46)1.00 (0.90 to 1.11)
JS + / ERI + / ED –, (n=13 543)0.50 (0.11 to 0.89)0.58 (0.32 to 0.83)1.14 (1.05 to 1.24)
JS + / ERI – / ED +, (n=5410)−0.05 (−0.53 to 0.44)0.31 (−0.01 to 0.63)1.01 (0.91 to 1.12)
JS – / ERI + / ED +, (n=9036)−0.84 (−1.27 to −0.40)0.30 (0.01 to 0.59)1.00 (0.92 to 1.10)
JS + / ERI – / ED –, (n=7497)0.71 (0.27 to 1.17)0.20 (−0.09 to 0.49)1.15 (1.04 to 1.26)
JS – / ERI + / ED –, (n=3868)0.23 (−0.30 to 0.76)0.56 (0.21 to 0.92)1.05 (0.94 to 1.17)
JS – / ERI – / ED +, (n=12 019)−0.73 (−1.14 to −0.32)0.04 (−0.23 to 0.31)0.95 (0.86 to 1.04)
  • The models are adjusted for age, sex, BMI, education, monthly income, pack-years, smoking, alcohol consumption and antihypertensive medication (not included for hypertension).

  • +, psychosocial work factor is >median; −, psychosocial work factor is ≤median; B, coefficients of the regression analyses; BMI, body mass index; ED, emotional demands; ERI, effort–reward imbalance; JS, job strain.