Table 3 Job insecurity combined with labour market chances and decline in self-rated health in 1809 employed women and 1918 employed men in Denmark (1995–2000)
VariablesExposedDecline in healthModel 1Model 2Model 3Model 4
NoNo (%)OR (95% CI)OR (95% CI)OR (95% CI)OR (95% CI)
Women (n = 1809)
Job insecurity and labour market chances
    No job insecurity1481149 (10.1)1111
    Job insecurity with good labour market chances14818 (12.2)1.42 (0.84 to 2.41)1.45 (0.85 to 2.48)1.44 (0.84 to 2.47)1.44 (0.84 to 2.47)
    Job insecurity with poor labour market chances18033 (18.3)2.04 (1.34 to 3.09)2.11 (1.38 to 3.22)2.07 (1.35 to 3.18)2.04 (1.32 to 3.15)
Men (n = 1918)
Job insecurity and labour market chances
    No job insecurity1614186 (11.5)1111
    Job insecurity with good labour market chances18622 (11.8)1.15 (0.71 to 1.85)1.11 (0.68 to 1.79)1.05 (0.64 to 1.71)0.87 (0.53 to 1.43)
    Job insecurity with poor labour market chances11822 (18.6)1.70 (1.04 to 2.77)1.60 (0.97 to 2.63)1.52 (0.92 to 2.52)1.37 (0.82 to 2.28)
  • Logistic regression analyses: model 1 is adjusted for age, model 2 is additionally adjusted for smoking and body mass index; model 3 is additionally adjusted for cohabitation, small children at home, socioeconomic position and type of employment; model 4 is additionally adjusted for “good” versus “very good” self-rated health at baseline.