eLetters

125 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Higher IHD and conventional risk factors in Scotland- incidence data paints a different picture
    Richard W Morris

    Dear Editor,

    Mitchell et al. have compared the prevalence of doctor diagnosed ischaemic heart disease between England and Scotland in 1998.[1] They found a higher prevalence of IHD in Scotland, and concluded that the distributions of established risk factors for coronary disease did not explain this difference.

    We have previously addressed the question of geographical variations in IHD across Great Br...

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  • Re: Atmospheric carcinogens and childhood cancers -- Environmental Tobacco Smoke should be included
    James M. Howard

    Dear Editor,

    Environmental smoke may also induce testosterone production in women and their fetuses. This has been demonstrated in female rats and their fetuses.

    Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Jun;5(3):369-74.

    Epidemiological studies have shown that smoking during pregnancy markedly increases the risk for future tobacco use by adolescent female offspring. It has been hypothesized that the increas...

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  • Black Workers For Infrastructure Revitalization
    Castan L. Comice

    Dear Editor,

    The Position Of The Black Workers For Infrastructure Revitalization

    Current state of the U.S. economy, with growing unemployment, requires a critical need for government to create massive jobs creation projects through revitalization of infrastructure of city, state and nation.

    The economy is going down and all workers must stand together for a strong united & democratic fron...

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  • Half of cases
    Al Rio

    Dear Editor,

    We are greatly disappointed to see the strange wording of the article by Prof E G Knox "Childhood cancers and atmospheric carcinogens", J. Epidemiol. Community Health [1], which says that "[t]he case material was extracted from a file of all 22 458 deaths from leukaemia or other cancer occurring before the 16th birthday in Great Britain between 1953 and 1980. They were classified into 11 main groups...

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  • This could be due to induced testosterone...
    James M. Howard
    Dear Editor,

    This report may be explained by increased maternal testosterone as a result of exposure to these chemicals, especially nitrogen dioxide.

    In 2004, I wrote "Negative Effects of Nitrogen Dioxide May be due to Testosterone".

    (http:/...

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  • Equity is based on need
    Oliver J Harding

    Dear Editor,

    I thought there was a consensus that a consideration of equity introduces the concept of need. For example in a population which is perfectly healthy apart from two individuals with an ingrowing toenail, there is health inequality. But there is only health inequity if one of these individuals has access to appropriate interventions to restore him or her to near perfect health, and the other does not....

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  • Multilevel models do not always a solution
    Grazyna T Adamiak

    Dear Editor,

    In the BMJ Robert J Glynn (Associate Professor of Medicine, Biostatistics) and Julie E Buring (Associate Professor of Ambulatory Care and Prevention) discussed the problem of recurrent events and the need of special methods when analysing correlated or dependent data (Education and debate. Ways of measuring rates of recurrent events. 1996;312:364-367; 10 February). They agreed however to prefer the nega...

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  • Scottishness and IHD
    Evan Llewelyn Lloyd

    Dear Editor

    I agree with Dr Mitchell that other factors need to be considered over and above the usual. I do not think genes are the answer because it has been shown that place of residence is more important than place of birth [1] and that for migrants the risk of IHD tends to change to that of the new country.[2]

    One factor which tends to be overlooked is the effect of cold. However cold is not...

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  • Re: Residence in mountainous compared with lowland areas in relation to total and coronary mortality
    J.G. Landers

    Dear Editor,

    In this paper the longer survival of inhabitants of Arachova, Greece at 950 metres elevation, compared with 2 lowland villages was ascribed to the exercise enforced by the mountainous terrain.

    There may be an additional explanation to do with food. Hauswirth et al. High w-3 Fatty Acid Content in Alpine Cheese. (Circulation 2004;109:l03-7) report from Switzerland that cheeses from alpine past...

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  • The sex ratio in offspring of male gasoline filling station workers
    Piet H. Jongbloet

    Dear Editor,

    James [1] endeavours an explanation of the low sex ratio in offspring of men exposed to petroleum fuel as reported by Ansari-Lari et al. [2] and mentions the reportedly low testosteron/gonadotrophin ratios in these circumstances. He also states that these low sex ratios are in contrast with the reports of high offspring sex ratios in communities exposed to active seepages of natural gas and oil and to pe...

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