eLetters

55 e-Letters

published between 2007 and 2010

  • The best recipe? Combining food taxes with subsidies on healthy foods
    Nick Wilson

    Dear Editor

    The Journal has previously explored interesting taxation and health issues [1,2] and the recent paper by Mytton et al [3] on food taxes is no exception. This new work nicely demonstrates the complexities, uncertainties and potential benefit of taxing certain foods as an instrument to reduce the high burden of chronic diseases. The key issues raised are which foods get substituted as a result of decrea...

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  • Displaces Excess Carbohydrates
    Charles R. Fred

    Dear Editor

    This fine study (full version not accessible to me), like so many studies claiming similar virtues for fruits and vegetables, in fact reflects the displacement of dense, non-evolutionary, carbohydrates (rice, pasta, potatoes, bread) by other macronutrients or by less dense carbs.

    All confirm the VLDL-generating (atherogenesis) and pancreas-straining (type2 diabetes) results of dietary carbohydra...

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  • Inequality and Technology: Partners in Crime.
    Prajesh N Chhanabhai

    Dear Editor

    This paper has brought about many topical issues regarding the ways to tackle social inequalities. However, one area that has not been mentioned is the impact of technology in contributing to inequality in healthcare.

    Currently the climate is shifting towards an electronic media, with a growing case for health to follow the same trend. In theory this seems to bridge the healthcare inequal...

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  • Interpreting departures from expected patterns of relative differences
    James P Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    Mustard and Etches examined the differences between male and female socioeconomic gradients in mortality, finding that, in absolute terms, the gradient is consistently larger for men, but that in relative terms, the gradients are equal or at least less consistently larger for men.[1] But efforts to evaluate differences in socioeconomic inequality in some outcome for groups with different overall rat...

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  • Role of the prevalence of an outcome in the size of rate differences
    James P. Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    Martikainen et al.[1] note that relative, and in some cases absolute, socioeconomic differences in mortality have increased in the past 15-25 years in some European countries and the US, and find that over the period 1971 to 2000 such increases also occurred in Finland. The authors, however, overlook the statistical tendency whereby the rarer an outcome, the greater the relative difference between ra...

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  • tackling Consent Bias
    Kannan anjur anjur

    Dear Editor,

    It is with great interest we read the response with well researched references to this article on bias. We were particularly curious to know how to tackle consent bias as consent is an ethical issue and many high risk persons do not get included in an epidemiological study both observational or interventional because of cultural values due to exclusion of non consenters.There should be a method to t...

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  • Re: Can Care be graded in any level?
    Kannan Anjur anjur

    Dear Editor

    Sorry that I am late in submitting my responses to the issue on grading of health care. My Institution is engaged in providing community based health services in marginalised population in the metroplis of Delhi with 10 million population with a record migration rate of 4% per year.The Ministry Of Health has taken a bold step in introducing Indian Public Health Standards in attempt to revamp and introd...

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  • Updating a glossary of biases
    Brian Buckley

    Dear Editor

    Miguel Delgado-Rodríguez and Javier Llorca’s article on bias in health services and medical research is instructive and cautionary [1]. The extensive glossary of biases is thought provoking and might beneficially be introduced as required reading for all researchers.

    The glossary might be usefully updated by the addition of a form of selection bias which is very much “of our time”, having be...

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  • Exploration using "moving window" methods
    Grazyna T Adamiak

    Dear Editor

    In the latest issue of the JECH, Rezeaiean, Dunn, St Leger and Appleby provide a multidisciplinary glossary on geographical epidemiology, spatial analysis and geographical information systems. The glossary in large is useful as it gives an overview of relevant methodological concepts. However, in the section on disease clustering the Authors shortly describe geographical machine analysis and spatial sc...

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  • Abandonment of Colour categories for ethnic groups is long overdue
    Charles Agyemang

    Editor - In this issue of the journal, Dr Peter John Aspinall has raised a very important issue regarding the question of whether colour categories for ethnic groups should be abandoned because of abolishment of colour categories in the Scotland census.[1]

    The Scottish population census team deserves congratulations for breaking the tradition in abandoning the colour categories used in 1991 and 2001.[2] This bol...

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