eLetters

125 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Pharmacist led medication reviews- on crossroads
    Seema Mangasuli

    Dear Editor,

    Over the years, pharmacy as a profession has evolved from mortar pestle to providing bed side services. Its only in the recent years that pharmacist has been recognized as a resource person in the health care team. Apart from the routine medication dispensing, medication chart review has been the most important job of the pharmacist in the hospital. All other activities like making active interventions...

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  • Changing Inequalities in Morbidity
    James P. Scanlan

    Findings concerning changing health inequalities like those presented by Adams et al.1 need to be appraised in light of the tendency whereby the rarer an outcome, the greater the difference in rates of experiencing it,2 -5, a tendency recently recognized in the Public Health Observatory Handbook of Health Inequalities Measurement issued by the Southeast Public Health Observatory.6 In the situations where an outcome was gene...

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  • Re: Skinfold thickness
    Joseph Kim

    Dear Dr Gill,

    The decision to use fourths of BMI, rather than a more traditional five-group categorisation of BMI (i.e., < 18 kg/m2, 18-25 kg/m2, 25-30 kg/m2, 30-35 kg/m2, > 35 kg/m2) was based on the availability of data. Though we considered using the more traditional approach, there were insufficient numbers of subjects and fatal events in the extreme BMI categories to justify its use. There were only...

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  • BMI and mortality risk
    Dr Rachel Gill

    Dear Editors,

    We were surprised by the conclusions drawn by Kim, Meade and Haines in their recent article ‘Skinfold thickness, body mass index, and fatal coronary heart disease: 30 year follow up of the Northwick Park heart study’, published in your journal.

    Whilst table one does show a significant difference between the distribution of BMI in the cohort who die of CHD and those who do not, the same da...

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  • Neural tube defects in eastern Turkey
    Alfred Koerblein

    Dear Editor,

    The study of Guvenc et al. finds an increase in the rate of neural tube defects after Chernobyl. But in the conclusions the authors suggest that factors other than radiation might be responsible for this effect since the maximum increase was found in 1988, well after 1986, the year of the Chernobyl accident. I have investigated the possible effect of the Chernobyl fallout on perinatal mortality in Ger...

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  • Safe bus stops
    Peter L. Jacobsen

    Dear Editor,

    These pictures say a lot about comforting people waiting for a bus. However, both bus stops fail to protect the people waiting from wayward motorists. Both structures appear flimsy, and would break upon being hit by a motor vehicle. Bus stops need stout bollards to protect the people waiting. While fear of crime is widely understood to deter bus use, fear of traffic injury is an under explored deterre...

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  • Blacktop roads
    Ian Napier

    Dear Editor,

    Belatedly, I have just read the paper by E.G.Knox (Oil Combustion and Childhood Cancers, J. Epidemial Community Health 2005;59:755-760). The author drew a relationship between motor vehicle emissions in high traffic areas and high incidence 'hot spots' of cancer, but I wonder if the potential hazards of road dust were considered as contributing factors. Blacktop roads comprise gravel bonded with...

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  • Regarding youth smoking risk and community patterns of alcohol availability and control
    Owen D Seddon

    Dear Editor,

    We are writing to congratulate Weitzman et al. (1) on their study of youth smoking risk. Smoking and alcohol are important public health topics and the paper offers thorough, clear analyses, particularly of the modelling.

    We would question whether the authors could have explored in more detail the issues of self reporting that are inherent in this type of study? For example, there is a possib...

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  • Response to Wenbin Lian
    Ingelise Andersen

    Dear Editor,

    Thank you for your interest in our article.[1] In our opinion, your comment, that gross household income (GHI) changed 24% of the increased risk among unskilled workers is not a real change, does not take into account that the two analyses are dependent. (Table 3, the two first columns). If the Hazard Ratio was 1.24 (the lower limit of th...

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  • Cost to NHS of treatment of food-related ill health
    Richard C Cottrell

    Dear Editor,

    Estimating the economic impact of ill health and the cost- benefit, and cost effectiveness, of interventions intended to reduce it, is an important but difficult exercise. The thoughtful paper by Rayner and Scarborough is to be welcomed as a serious attempt to quantify one aspect of this calculation: the direct costs to the NHS of treatment arising from the proportion of certain diseases attributabl...

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