eLetters

125 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Updating a glossary of biases
    Brian Buckley

    Dear Editor

    Miguel Delgado-Rodríguez and Javier Llorca’s article on bias in health services and medical research is instructive and cautionary [1]. The extensive glossary of biases is thought provoking and might beneficially be introduced as required reading for all researchers.

    The glossary might be usefully updated by the addition of a form of selection bias which is very much “of our time”, having be...

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  • Exploration using "moving window" methods
    Grazyna T Adamiak

    Dear Editor

    In the latest issue of the JECH, Rezeaiean, Dunn, St Leger and Appleby provide a multidisciplinary glossary on geographical epidemiology, spatial analysis and geographical information systems. The glossary in large is useful as it gives an overview of relevant methodological concepts. However, in the section on disease clustering the Authors shortly describe geographical machine analysis and spatial sc...

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  • Abandonment of Colour categories for ethnic groups is long overdue
    Charles Agyemang

    Editor - In this issue of the journal, Dr Peter John Aspinall has raised a very important issue regarding the question of whether colour categories for ethnic groups should be abandoned because of abolishment of colour categories in the Scotland census.[1]

    The Scottish population census team deserves congratulations for breaking the tradition in abandoning the colour categories used in 1991 and 2001.[2] This bol...

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  • Interpreting changes in relative inequalities in receipt of procedures
    James P. Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    Studies of changing inequalities in receipt of procedures like that carried out with respect to revascularization by Hetemaa et al.[1] need to be undertaken with an appreciation of the statistical tendency whereby the rarer an outcome the greater the relative difference in rates of experiencing it and the smaller the relative difference in rates of avoiding it.[2-6]

    Most research into inequa...

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  • Cancer and altitude differences
    Joseph G. Landers

    Dear Editor

    In their prospective study, Baibas et al (JECH 2005;59(4):274- 8)showed that, in a Greek mountain village at 950 metres, total mortality and not merely coronary mortality was lower than in two lowland villages. What follows assumes that the cancer figures included within "other causes" follow this pattern.

    In 'Geographic Cancer Risk and Intracellular Potassium/Sodium ratios'.Cancer Detection...

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  • Multilevel modelling of the longitudinal influence of neighbourhoods on health
    Alastair H Leyland

    Dear Editor

     

    ...

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  • An Excellent Model for Adapting Tobacco Questionnaires
    Kamal Chaouachi

    Dear Editor,

    I wish to thank Dr Hanna and her colleagues for this excellent study (1). I would like to share below a few comments....

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  • Interpreting patterns of inequalities in perinatal outcomes
    James P. Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    The results of the study by Fairley and Leyland [1] of changing social class inequalities in perinatal outcomes in Scotland must be interpreted in light of the statistical tendency whereby the rarer an outcome the greater the relative differences in experiencing the outcome and the smaller the relative difference in avoiding the outcome.[2-6] In times of declines in adverse outcome (the more common...

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  • Female literacy: An important determinant of women’s health
    AnandaGiri M Shankar

    Dear Sir,

    The article by Mohindra SK et al brings about clearly the effect of caste and socioeconomic position on women’s health [1]. If this is the case in Kerala, which is one of the states with good health indicators in India, one can imagine what it would be with more poorer and deprived states in India. We believe that along with socioeconomic status and caste, female literacy is one of the key determinant...

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  • Well researched, well written.
    Manabu Sakuta

    Dear Editor

    Well researched and well written paper, indeed. We japanese as a whole don't even know what is going to happen. Only the powerful Ministry of Finance and Japan Tobacco Co know what is going on. I hope everybody in Japan read this article. By doing so, their way of people manipulation will slowly change. Thank you for your in depth research work.

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