eLetters

125 e-Letters

published between 2004 and 2007

  • Roles for social epidemiologists in public health activism
    Julie G. Cwikel

    Dear Dr. van Lenthe,

    Thank you for your review of my recently published book "Social Epidemiology - Strategies for Public Health Activism". You raise the question of how social epidemiologists can find "strategies to put social epidemiological findings into practice". In Chapter 9, pages 273-309, readers of the book will find a comprehensive review entitled "Theories for Social Epidemiological Interventions"...

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  • Comments on the “Systematic review of the fetal effects of prenatal binge-drinking” paper by Henders
    María Luisa Martínez-Frías

    Dear Editor,

    It was with great interest that I read the recent article by Henderson et al.,[1] as my main interests are closely related to the potential effects of alcohol consumption (and that of other drugs) during pregnancy. However, although I agree that some of the issues they raise are relevant, there are several aspects of this article [1] that concern me, about which I would like to offer some reflection...

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  • Death, Drugs, and Rock ’n’ Roll
    Borwin Bandelow

    Dear Editor

    The interesting paper of Dr Bellis and colleagues [1] reports strikingly increased mortality in rock and pop stars. A widespread opinion is that fame is the reason for the manifold psychological problems of the stars. These problems are seen as a consequence of the pressure of the fans, the media, the music industry, or obtrusive paparazzi. Also, the availability of drugs and alcohol and the problem of...

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  • The best recipe? Combining food taxes with subsidies on healthy foods
    Nick Wilson

    Dear Editor

    The Journal has previously explored interesting taxation and health issues [1,2] and the recent paper by Mytton et al [3] on food taxes is no exception. This new work nicely demonstrates the complexities, uncertainties and potential benefit of taxing certain foods as an instrument to reduce the high burden of chronic diseases. The key issues raised are which foods get substituted as a result of decrea...

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  • Displaces Excess Carbohydrates
    Charles R. Fred

    Dear Editor

    This fine study (full version not accessible to me), like so many studies claiming similar virtues for fruits and vegetables, in fact reflects the displacement of dense, non-evolutionary, carbohydrates (rice, pasta, potatoes, bread) by other macronutrients or by less dense carbs.

    All confirm the VLDL-generating (atherogenesis) and pancreas-straining (type2 diabetes) results of dietary carbohydra...

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  • Inequality and Technology: Partners in Crime.
    Prajesh N Chhanabhai

    Dear Editor

    This paper has brought about many topical issues regarding the ways to tackle social inequalities. However, one area that has not been mentioned is the impact of technology in contributing to inequality in healthcare.

    Currently the climate is shifting towards an electronic media, with a growing case for health to follow the same trend. In theory this seems to bridge the healthcare inequal...

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  • Interpreting departures from expected patterns of relative differences
    James P Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    Mustard and Etches examined the differences between male and female socioeconomic gradients in mortality, finding that, in absolute terms, the gradient is consistently larger for men, but that in relative terms, the gradients are equal or at least less consistently larger for men.[1] But efforts to evaluate differences in socioeconomic inequality in some outcome for groups with different overall rat...

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  • Role of the prevalence of an outcome in the size of rate differences
    James P. Scanlan

    Dear Editor

    Martikainen et al.[1] note that relative, and in some cases absolute, socioeconomic differences in mortality have increased in the past 15-25 years in some European countries and the US, and find that over the period 1971 to 2000 such increases also occurred in Finland. The authors, however, overlook the statistical tendency whereby the rarer an outcome, the greater the relative difference between ra...

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  • tackling Consent Bias
    Kannan anjur anjur

    Dear Editor,

    It is with great interest we read the response with well researched references to this article on bias. We were particularly curious to know how to tackle consent bias as consent is an ethical issue and many high risk persons do not get included in an epidemiological study both observational or interventional because of cultural values due to exclusion of non consenters.There should be a method to t...

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  • Re: Can Care be graded in any level?
    Kannan Anjur anjur

    Dear Editor

    Sorry that I am late in submitting my responses to the issue on grading of health care. My Institution is engaged in providing community based health services in marginalised population in the metroplis of Delhi with 10 million population with a record migration rate of 4% per year.The Ministry Of Health has taken a bold step in introducing Indian Public Health Standards in attempt to revamp and introd...

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