eLetters

77 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • The minor (80-50) and the major (qy); Re: More accurately?
    Ioannis D K Dimoliatis

    Dear Editor

    Vlassov[1] detected something wrong in my short piece.[2] I would like to thank him very much. The correct lines 2 and 3 of paragraph 2 are: DALYs=(0.33)x(50y)+(1.0)x(80y-50y)=46.5y.

    However, this is the minor, I think: the reader can easily understand or infer that printer's devil has replaced a 5 with a 3.

    The major is that a mistake in the title escaped detection: the unit of m...

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  • The prevention of vaccine reactions
    C Alan B Clemetson, M.D.

    Dear Editor

    I read the article by Jefferson[1] with interest. Although they are rare, vaccine reactions do occur and are suspected of having severe consequences.[2-4] It is here suggested that it is mainly those infants who already have somewhat depleted vitamin C stores, who are affected most. We now know that even modest ascorbate depletion is associated with very high blood histamine levels,[5], as shown in figu...

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  • This may be due to increased testosterone...
    James M. Howard

    Dear Editor

    I suggest the findings of Gouveia et al[1] may be due to increased testosterone. It is my hypothesis that increased maternal testosterone causes prematurity and low birth weight.

    In rats, nitrogen dioxide increases maternal testosterone specifically.[2] It may be that increased exposure to nitrogen dioxide may increase prematurity and low birth weight because of increased maternal te...

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  • More accurately?
    Vasiliy V Vlassov
    Dear Editor

    We read the Letter by Dimoliatis with interest.[1] However, "0.33x50+1.0x(80–50) = 46.5", more accurately, we had to put QALYs = (0.67)x(50y) = 33.5y and DALYs = (0.33)x(50y)+(1.0)x(80y–30y) = 46.5y.

    If substitute (80-50) by (80-30) result must be different.

    I believe that something is wrong in this short piece intended to add clarity!

    Reference

    1. Dimoliatis I D K. Qual...

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  • The incidence of glaucoma in Japanese workers is comparable to a white population
    Pieter Gouws

    Dear Editor

    I congratulate the Tatemichi et al on an interesting study.[1] However, as this paper has been widely sited in the general press, I would like to point out that this study does not show that heavy computer use causes glaucoma as suggested by the international press agencies.

    The prevalence of open angle glaucoma is well known from various epidemiological studies and ranges from 1-3% in...

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  • History of public health: the role of exemplars
    Raj S Bhopal

    Dear Editor

    “The further back you look, the further forward you can see”. These words of Winston Churchill are the compelling reason for backing Berridge and Gorsky’s,[1] and Scally and Womack’s[2] calls for more attention to public health history.

    The lessons I have learnt from history are that my work is part of a long tradition, that many others have struggled with the same type of challenges th...

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  • Fibrinogen, social position and risk of heart disease: a further response
    John Macleod

    Dear Editor

    Jousilahti and Salomaa appear unhappy with our response to their paper on the social patterning of serum inflammatory markers.

    First they feel that we have misinterpreted their findings and conclusions. We fail to see how. They found (as others have) that social disadvantage was associated with increased inflammation – as indexed by markers such as higher fibrinogen - and that this association...

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  • Unmasking the social amplification of SARS panic
    Wayne Kao

    Dear Editor

    After a journey to Asia during the SARS outbreak, Syed et al suggested that "the public health significance of such potent symbols as the face mask may be considered in strategies to tackle other emerging infections" [1]. Nevertheless, like other unsolved puzzles of the SARS emergence, the exact impact and lesson learned from this collective and profound symbol of masks wearing is still controversia...

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  • Still male dominance is rampant
    Laxmi Vilas Ghimire
    Dear Editor

    It was very interesting to go through the article by Lawor.[1] Since long ago women have been one way or the other victim of male dominance. In different societies, there exists varieties of myths and superstition that women should not be as independent as men are. They have their own status which they should maintain and not compete with the males, still this sort of speech exists in most part of South Asia....

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  • Author's second reply to Boyle
    Enrique Gracia

    Dear Editor

    Boyle [1] raises very interesting points that deserve rigorous research and debate -see, for example, a recent editorial in BMJ by Ferries [2] on these and related issues. I believe that the debate over these issues contributes to increase their visibility for the research and professional communities, a visibility that hopefully will increase public, scientific and professional concern for domestic...

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