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Gestational weight gain in a migration context: are migrant women more at risk of inadequate or excessive weight gain during pregnancy?
  1. Lorraine Poncet1,2,
  2. Henri Panjo1,
  3. Thomas Schmitz3,4,
  4. Dominique Luton5,
  5. Laurent Mandelbrot6,
  6. Candice Estellat7,
  7. Armelle Andro2,8,
  8. Virginie Ringa1,
  9. Elie Azria3,9
  1. 1CESP Primary Care and Prevention Team, Université Paris-Saclay, UVSQ, Université Paris-Sud, INSERM, Villejuif, France
  2. 2French Collaborative Institute on Migrations, France, Paris, France
  3. 3Obstetrical, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology (EPOPé research team), DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Paris Descartes University, 53 Avenue de l’Observatoire, INSERM U1153, Paris, France
  4. 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hopital Universitaire Mere-enfant Robert-Debre, Paris, France
  5. 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Hopital Bichat - Claude-Bernard, Paris, France
  6. 6Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, DHU Risks in Pregnancy, Hopital Louis-Mourier, Colombes, France
  7. 7Department of Biostatistics, Public Health and Medical Information, Clinical research unit, Pharmacoepidemiology center, Hopital Universitaire Pitie Salpetriere, Paris, France
  8. 8Institute of demography research center, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris, France
  9. 9Department of Obstetrics, Groupe hospitalier Paris Saint-Joseph, Paris, France
  1. Correspondence to Ms Lorraine Poncet, CESP Primary Care and Prevention Team, Université Paris-Saclay, UVSQ, Université Paris-Sud, INSERM, Villejuif, France; poncet.lorraine{at}gmail.com

Abstract

Background Inadequate or excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Little is known on adequacy of GWG in migrant women. This study investigates whether migrant women in France are at higher risk of inadequate or excessive GWG, and what characteristics are associated with GWG in migrant and non-migrant groups.

Methods We used data from the PreCARE multicentric prospective cohort (N=10 419). The study includes 5403 women with singleton deliveries, with non-migrant (n=2656) and migrant (n=2747) status. We used multinomial logistic regression, adjusting for maternal age and parity, to investigate the association of migrant status, socioeconomic status-related variables and GWG. In stratified analyses, we identified factors associated with GWG in both groups.

Results Compared with non-migrant women, migrant women had increased risk of inadequate GWG (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.18; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.34). Non-migrant women with foreign origins had increased risk of excessive GWG (aOR 1.58; 95% CI 1.30 to 1.92). Women born in Sub-Saharan Africa had increased risk of both inadequate and excessive GWG. Regardless of migration status, women with lower education and women who did not start pregnancy with a normal weight were less likely to gain adequately. Inadequate prenatal care was associated with inadequate GWG only among non-migrant women.

Conclusion Migrant women are at higher risk of inadequate GWG.

  • human migration
  • perinatal epidemiology
  • social inequalities

Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request. The data underlying the findings cannot be made freely available because of ethical and legal restrictions (French laws on data protection). Indeed, the present analysis involves a large number of variables that, combined, could be used to reidentify the participating women or children based on a few key characteristics, and then to have access to other personal data. Therefore, the French ethical authority (Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés) strictly forbids making such data freely available. However, all relevant data can be obtained upon request from the PreCARE steering committee. Readers may contact EA (eazria@hpsj.fr) to request the data.

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Data availability statement

Data are available on reasonable request. The data underlying the findings cannot be made freely available because of ethical and legal restrictions (French laws on data protection). Indeed, the present analysis involves a large number of variables that, combined, could be used to reidentify the participating women or children based on a few key characteristics, and then to have access to other personal data. Therefore, the French ethical authority (Commission Nationale de l’Informatique et des Libertés) strictly forbids making such data freely available. However, all relevant data can be obtained upon request from the PreCARE steering committee. Readers may contact EA (eazria@hpsj.fr) to request the data.

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