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Occupational level of the father and alcohol consumption during adolescence; patterns and predictors
  1. M Droomers1,
  2. C T M Schrijvers1,
  3. S Casswell2,
  4. J P Mackenbach1
  1. 1Department of Public Health, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
  2. 2APHRU, Auckland University, New Zealand
  1. Correspondence to: 
 Mariël Droomers, RIVM/PZO, Interne Postbak 84, PO Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, Netherlands; 
 mariel.droomers{at}rivm.nl

Abstract

Study objective: This paper describes and attempts to explain the association between occupational level of the father and high alcohol consumption among a cohort of New Zealand adolescents from age 11 to 21.

Design: Data were obtained from the longitudinal Dunedin multidisciplinary health and development study. At each measurement wave, those who then belonged to the quartile that reported the highest usual amount of alcohol consumed on a typical drinking occasion were categorised as high alcohol consumers. Potential predictors of high alcohol consumption included environmental factors, individual factors, and educational achievement measured at age 9, 11, or 13. Longitudinal logistic GEE analyses described and explained the relation between father’s occupation and adolescent alcohol consumption.

Setting: Dunedin, New Zealand.

Participants: About 1000 children were followed up from birth in 1972 until adulthood.

Main results: A significant association between fathers’ occupation and adolescent alcohol consumption emerged at age 15. Overall adolescents from the lowest occupational group had almost twice the odds of being a large consumer than the highest occupational group. The association between father’s occupation and high alcohol consumption during adolescence was explained by the higher prevalence of familial alcohol problems and friends approving of alcohol consumption, lower intelligence scores, and lower parental attachment among adolescents from lower occupational groups.

Conclusions: Socioeconomic background affects adolescent alcohol consumption substantially. This probably contributes to cumulation of disadvantage. Prevention programmes should focus on adolescents from lower socioeconomic groups and make healthier choices the easier choices by means of environmental change.

  • adolescence
  • alcohol consumption
  • occupational status
  • intelligence
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Footnotes

  • Conflicts of interest: none.

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