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Influence of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status on mortality among black, Mexican-American, and white women and men in the United States
  1. M A Winkleby,
  2. C Cubbin
  1. Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, USA
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr M A Winkleby, Stanford Center for Research in Disease Prevention, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1000 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304–1825, USA; 
 winkleby{at}stanford.edu

Abstract

Study objectives: This study examines the influence of individual and neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality among black, Mexican-American, and white women and men in the US. The authors had three study objectives. Firstly, they examined mortality rates by both individual level SES (measured by income, education, and occupational/employment status) and neighbourhood level SES (index of neighbourhood income/wealth, educational attainment, occupational status, and employment status). Secondly, they examined whether neighbourhood SES was associated with mortality after controlling for individual SES. Thirdly, they calculated the population attributable risk to estimate the reduction in mortality rates if all women and men lived in the highest SES neighbourhoods.

Design: National Health Interview Survey (1987–1994), linked with 1990 census tract (neighbourhood proxy) and mortality data through 1997.

Setting/participants: Nationally representative sample of 59 935 black, 19 201 Mexican-American, and 344 432 white men and women (six gender and racial/ethnic groups), aged 25–64 at interview.

Main results: Mortality rates for all six gender and racial/ethnic groups were two to four times higher for those with the lowest incomes (lowest quartile) who lived in the lowest SES neighbourhoods (lowest tertile) compared with those with the highest incomes who lived in the highest SES neighbourhoods. For the six groups, the age adjusted mortality risk associated with living in the lowest SES neighbourhoods ranged from 1.43 to 1.61. The mortality risk decreased but remained significant (p values <.05) after adjusting for each of the three individual measures of SES, with the exception of Mexican-American women. Furthermore, the mortality risk associated with living in the lowest SES neighbourhoods remained significant after simultaneously adjusting for all three individual measures of SES for white men (p<0.001) and white women (p<0.05). Deaths would hypothetically be reduced by about 20% for each subgroup if everyone had the same death rates as those living in the highest SES neighbourhoods (highest tertile).

Conclusions: Living in a low SES neighbourhood confers additional mortality risk beyond individual SES.

  • ethnic goups
  • mortality
  • residence characteristics
  • socioeconomic factors
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  • .

    Correction
    There is an error in Figure 2.
    The uppermost value on the y-axis for Mexican-American women should read 1000 (not 100).
    Also, the income-to-needs labels should have been rotated for clarity of reading.

    A corrected version of the figure is avialable here as a PDF (printer-friendly file)

     

    The error is much regretted

    Files in this Data Supplement:

Footnotes

  • Funding: this work was co-funded by the National Institute of Environmental Sciences and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: grant 1 RO1 HL67731 to Dr Winkleby.

  • Conflicts of interest: none.

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