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Impact of area regeneration policies: performing integral interventions, changing opportunity structures and reducing health inequalities
  1. Angel R Zapata Moya1,
  2. Clemente J Navarro Yáñez2
  1. 1Department of Social Anthropology, Basic Psychology and Public Health, Centre for Urban Political Sociology and Policies, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain
  2. 2Department of Sociology, Centre for Urban Political Sociology and Policies, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville, Spain
  1. Correspondence to Angel R Zapata Moya, Centre for Urban Political Sociology and Policies, Department of Social Anthropology, Basic Psychology and Public Health, Building 14-1-34, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville-Spain; arzapmoy{at}upo.es

Abstract

Background Urban regeneration policies are area-based interventions addressing multidimensional problems. In this study, we analyse the impact of urban regeneration processes on the evolution of inequalities in mortality from certain causes. On the basis of Fundamental Cause Theory (FCT), our main hypothesis is that the impact of urban regeneration programmes will be more clearly observed on the causes of preventable deaths, as these programmes imply a direct or indirect improvement to a whole range of ‘flexible resources’ that residents in relevant areas have access to, and which ultimately may influence the inverse relationship between socioeconomic status and health.

Methods Using a quasi-experimental design and data from Longitudinal Statistics on Survival and Longevity of Andalusia (Spain), we analyse differences in the evolution of standard mortality ratios for preventable and less-preventable causes of premature death. This encompasses 59 neighbourhoods in 37 municipalities where urban regeneration projects were implemented in the last decade within the framework of three different programmes and in 59 counterparts where these policies were not implemented.

Results As expected in line with FCT, there are no significant patterns in the evolution of internal differences in terms of less-preventable mortality. However, excessive preventable mortality strongly decreases in the neighbourhoods with intervention programmes, specifically in those where two or more projects were in force. This is even more apparent for women.

Conclusions The urban regeneration policies studied seem to contribute to reducing health inequity when the interventions are more integral in nature.

  • Health inequalities
  • HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENT
  • POLICY
  • MORTALITY
  • Neighborhood/place

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