Article Text

PDF
Metabolic syndrome components as markers to prognosticate the risk of developing chronic kidney disease: evidence-based study with 6492 individuals
  1. Davoud Zomorrodian1,2,
  2. Abolfazl Khajavi-Rad3,4,
  3. Amir Avan1,5,
  4. Mahmoud Ebrahimi6,
  5. Mohsen Nematy2,
  6. Mahmoud Reza Azarpazhooh6,
  7. Marzieh Emamian1,
  8. Mahsa Sadeghzade1,
  9. Seyed Reza Mirhafez1,
  10. Maryam Mohammadi1,
  11. Mina Mousavi1,
  12. Habibollah Esmaeili7,
  13. Mohsen Moohebati6,
  14. Mohammad Reza Parizadeh2,
  15. Gordon A Ferns8,
  16. Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan1,2,6
  1. 1Department of Modern Science and Technologies, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  2. 2Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  3. 3Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  4. 4Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK
  5. 5Faculty of Medicine, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  6. 6Cardiovascular Research Center, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  7. 7Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  8. 8Division of Medical Education, Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Brighton, Sussex, UK
  1. Correspondence to Professor Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan, Faculty of Medicine, Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad 91746, Iran; ghayourm{at}mums.ac.ir

Abstract

Objective The global prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) appears to be increasing and the impact of this condition on potential comorbidities such as cardiovascular disease is high. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also a potential comorbidity of MetS but the method of screening for this is somewhat controversial. Thus, predictive markers that can predict the risk of developing CKD are warranted for identification of patients with MetS at an increased risk.

Research methods/patients We investigated the occurrence of CKD in 6492 individuals, either with or without MetS.

Results Our results showed that the prevalence of CKD was markedly higher in those individuals with MetS, and increased progressively with the number of MetS components and age. Waist circumference, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly (p<0.05) associated with altered levels of urea nitrogen, glomerular filtration rate and creatinine, and were related to the increased risk of CKD (eg, OR 1.293 (95% CI 1.10 to 1.52; p=0.002)). The relative risk of CKD remained statistically significant for uric acid following multivariate analyses and adjusting for MetS-associated factors.

Conclusions Our data demonstrated the association of MetS components with CKD in our population and revealed that susceptibility to CKD was increased with the number of defining features of MetS. These findings prompt prospective studies to determine the impact of preventing and detecting MetS on the risk of developing CKD.

  • AGEING
  • BLOOD PRESSURE
  • Epidemiology of chronic diseases

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.