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Chronic disease
SP1-34 Pubertal muscle mass and diabetes markers in Chinese adolescents: evidence from the Hong Kong's “Children of 1997” birth cohort
  1. L L Shi1,
  2. S L Lee2,
  3. L L Hui1,
  4. S L Au Yeung1,
  5. M A Tse3,
  6. G M Leung1,
  7. C M Schooling1
  1. 1The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
  2. 2Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China
  3. 3Institute of Human Performance, Hong Kong, China

Abstract

Introduction There is an emerging epidemic of diabetes in China despite a relatively non-obese population. Genetics and lifestyle undoubtedly play a key role. We hypothesise that environmentally driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty may also be relevant. To test this hypothesis we examined the association of sex-steroids with muscle mass and of muscle mass with fasting glucose and insulin in a sample of Chinese adolescents.

Methods In 40 adolescents (20 boys, 20 girls, age 12.9±0.1 years), from Hong Kong's “Children of 1997” birth cohort, we assessed fasting glucose, insulin, sex-steroids and sex hormone binding globulin from a morning blood sample, and muscle and fat mass from a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan. Lifestyle was obtained from a questionnaire. We used multivariable linear regression to assess adjusted associations.

Results Free and bio-available testosterone were positively associated with muscle mass, as was physical activity. Muscle mass was associated with lower glucose (−0.04 mmol/l, 95% CI −0.08 to −0.01 per kg muscle mass) and lower insulin (−0.94 uU/ml, 95% CI −1.75 to −0.14); adjusted for sex and fat mass.

Conclusions Environmentally driven muscle mass acquisition at puberty could potentially be an additional factor influencing diabetes, of which further investigation is warranted.

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