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Epidemiology and policy
P1-297 Maternal characteristics in relation to low birth weight infants in a Japanese cohort study
  1. D Qiu1,
  2. N Sakamoto1,
  3. N Arata2,
  4. Y Ohya3
  1. 1Department of Social Medicine, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan
  2. 2Department of Women's Health, National Medical Center for Children and Mothers, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan
  3. 3Department of Medical Specialties, National Medical Center for Children and Mothers, National Center for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan

Abstract

Introduction A low birth weight (LBW) is an important indicator of infant morbidity and mortality. There is also growing evidence that the adverse consequences of LBW may continue throughout a subject's life. The aim of this study was to determine the association of maternal factors during pre-pregnancy and pregnancy with LBW in a Japanese population.

Methods A prospective cohort study carried out in Tokyo by the National Center for Child Health and Development of Japan was performed between 1 October 2003 and 31 December 2005. A total of 1338 pregnant women with singleton pregnancies were recruited at ≦16 weeks gestation and followed-up until partus. Logistic regression models were used to assess the risk factors for LBW.

Results A maternal age of 30–34 years (OR=2.83, 95% CI 1.17 to 6.88), an increase in maternal height in cm (OR=0.94, 95% CI 0.89 to 0.99), pre-pregnancy body mass index <18.5 kg/m2 (OR=2.53, 95% CI 1.47 to 4.34), gestational weight gain during pregnancy <7 kg (OR=2.27, 95% CI 1.18 to 4.36), passive exposure to smoking at work early in pregnancy (OR=2.48, 95% CI 1.16 to 5.28), an increase in annual household income (p for trend=0.01), a history of oral ferrotherapy to treat anaemia (OR=0.31, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.71) and gestational age ≧37 weeks (OR=0.01, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.02) were significantly associated with LBW.

Conclusions Our findings suggest that higher maternal socio-economic status, passive exposure to smoking early in pregnancy, pre-pregnancy thinness and insufficient weight gain during pregnancy are important predisposing factors for LBW, and a history of oral ferrotherapy to treat anaemia seems to decrease the risk of LBW.

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