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J Epidemiol Community Health 64:523-529 doi:10.1136/jech.2008.086785
  • Research report

Changing stroke mortality trends in middle-aged people: an age–period–cohort analysis of routine mortality data in persons aged 40 to 69 in England

  1. Paola Dey1
  1. 1School of Public Health and Clinical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
  2. 2School of Nursing and Caring Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr Chris J Sutton, School of Public Health and Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE, UK; cjsutton{at}uclan.ac.uk
  • Accepted 14 September 2009
  • Published Online First 11 October 2009

Abstract

Background In the UK, overall stroke mortality has declined. A similar trend has been seen in coronary heart disease, although recent reports suggest this decline might be levelling off in middle-aged adults.

Aim To investigate recent trends in stroke mortality among those aged 40–69 years in England.

Methods The authors used routine annual aggregated stroke death and population data for England for the years 1979–2005 to investigate time trends in gender-specific mortalities for adults aged 40 to 69 years. The authors applied log-linear modelling to isolate effects attributable to age, linear ‘drift’ over time, time period and birth cohort.

Results Between 1979 and 2005, age-standardised stroke mortality aged 40 to 69 years dropped from 93 to 30 per 100 000 in men and from 62 to 18 per 100 000 in women. Mortality was higher in older age groups, but the difference between the older and younger age groups appears to have decreased over time for both sexes. Modelling of the data suggests an average annual reduction in stroke deaths of 4.0% in men and 4.3% in women, although this decrease has been particularly marked in the last few years. However, we also observed a relative rate increase in mortality among those born since the mid-1940s compared with earlier cohorts; this appears to have been sustained in men, which explains the levelling off in the rate of mortality decline observed in recent years in the younger middle-aged.

Conclusions If observed trends in middle-aged adults continue, overall stroke mortalities may start to increase again.

Footnotes

  • Competing interests None.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.