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Bringing chronic disease epidemiology and infectious disease epidemiology back together
  1. Bernard C K Choi1,
  2. Howard Morrison1,
  3. Tom Wong2,
  4. Jun Wu2,
  5. Yong-Ping Yan3
  1. 1Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada
  2. 2Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Canada
  3. 3Department of Epidemiology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, China; Visiting scientist at the Public Health Agency of Canada
  1. Correspondence to:
 Dr. B C K Choi
 Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, AL no. 6701A, 120 Colonnade Road, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1B4, Canada; Bernard_Choi{at}phac-aspc.gc.ca

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When modern epidemiology first took shape, there was only one kind of epidemiology – epidemiology, period. Over time has come specialisation into chronic and infectious disease epidemiology. Does this segregation into chronic and infectious disease epidemiologies benefit public health?

Dividing epidemiology into chronic disease and infectious disease “camps” is, in itself, problematic, in that each is based on an incompatible classification system. One classification is based on cause (infectious and non-infectious diseases) while the second is based on effect (chronic and acute diseases).1 Many chronic diseases have …

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