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Unreported cases of domestic violence against women: towards an epidemiology of social silence, tolerance, and inhibition
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  • Published on:
    Author's second reply to Boyle

    Dear Editor

    Boyle [1] raises very interesting points that deserve rigorous research and debate -see, for example, a recent editorial in BMJ by Ferries [2] on these and related issues. I believe that the debate over these issues contributes to increase their visibility for the research and professional communities, a visibility that hopefully will increase public, scientific and professional concern for domestic...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Re: Author's reply
    Dear Editor

    Gracia is right about the "softer" benefits of routine inquiry for domestic violence and the role of societal attitudes is crucial in overcoming this problem.[1] Certainly the role of public awareness campaigns, though difficult to evaluate, has probably reduced social tolerance towards violence against women. Evidence and the lack of evidence is a tricky issue for domestic violence screening. This seems t...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply

    Dear Editor

    The letter by Boyle points out that there is not sufficient evidence to recommend screening for domestic violence, which is not to say that there is sufficient evidence to recommend against screening.[1] Recommendations for screening or routine inquiry for domestic violence have been made on other grounds.

    For example, the US Preventive Services Task Force concluded that “there is insuffici...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Domestic violence screening, evidence is lacking

    Dear Editor

    The editorial by Gracia highlights the hidden nature of domestic violence and he is right to outline the role of society in uncovering this problem.[1] Definitional issues for epidemiologists are extremely complex in this field, and are further complicated by differing definitions used in criminal justice and voluntary organisations. There is little clear consensus as to the definition of 'domestic' or '...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.